Marcus Bonfanti, Mike Tinsley, Eve Selis, Jon Byrne and Jerry Naylor

Interviews from 17th June include Marcus Bonfanti, Mike Tinsley of Hedgehoppers Anonymous, Eve Sellis, Jon Byrne and Jerry Naylor of The Crickets.


Marcus Bonfanti was reviewed by The Guardian as “in his late 20s, and has learned his guitar technique and stage skills the hard way, by playing dozens of shows. London-based and with an Italian dad and British mum, he has developed an accent that meanders across the Atlantic and a style that can cover blues of almost any kind, from stomping, amplified styles to delicate acoustic finger-picking, as he proved on his album What Good Am I to You? Here, he concentrated largely on the high-energy songs, reserving a quieter, slinky display of his solo work for the encore. He succeeded because he has a powerful, gutsy voice and the ability to switch between rapid-fire strumming to impressive slide-playing on his often rapid-fire solos.”

Mike Tinsleys career in singing and songwriting started in the ’60s when he was the lead singer with Hedgehoppers Anonymous. He sang in the Yamaha World Song Festival in 1976, where he met Ellis Elias and was invited to team up with Peter Yellowstone to write songs for Joe Dolan and Kelly Marie.

Eve Selis isn’t just a “singer” — she’s an emotion transducer who converts country, R&B, blues, folk, and rock ‘n’ roll signals into a megawatt zap that galvanizes everyone in its path. And as with fellow femme-furnace frontwomen Bonnie Raitt, Joan Osborne, Maria McKee, Melissa Etheridge, and Lydia Pense, the cauterizing power of Selis’s voice can arc-weld material from almost any genre into a personal manifesto.

Jon Byrne’s rise to prominence has, surprisingly, been a long and arduous one. However, the struggle to be recognised as one of modern music’s most gifted of songwriters shouldn’t have happened any other way if ‘suffering for your art’ can be considered as the romantic model in all this. Jon’s struggle has made him the person he is today, it has shaped him and more importantly it has made him incredibly astute in fine tuning the detail within the poetry of his lyrics. He is a great social commentator and his observational accuracy, in these ever changing times, is as sharp as Sweeney Todd’s cut throat razor.

Jerry Naylor is an American country and rock and roll artist and broadcaster and inspirational speaker, who was the lead singer of The Crickets following the death of Buddy Holly.

Marcus Bonfanti

Mike Tinsley of Hedgehoppers Anonymous

Eve Selis

Jon Byrne

Jerry Naylor of The Crickets